WWW2003 Logo
background gradient image

Read before
Budapest

News

Invitation

Programme

Registration
(normal fee
for all)

- Tours
- Hotels

WWW2003
Venue

Final poster
submission

Permission &
Release Forms

Volunteer
Information

Privacy
Statement

Conference
Committee

Invited
Speakers

Sponsorship/
Exhibition Opportunities

About
Hungary

Previous WWW
Conferences

Contact Us

WWW2003
Home

Gradient background image   http://www2003.org

Gradient background image

The Twelfth International World Wide Web Conference 
20-24 May 2003, Budapest, HUNGARY 

Authors of selected papers will be invited to prepare enhanced versions for fast track journal publications in Computer Networks, IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering, World Wide Web: Internet and Information Systems, and the Journal of Web Engineering.

WWW2003 Camera-ready paper submission

The International World Wide Web Conference Committee (IW3C2) and the Computer and Automation Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA SZTAKI) cordially invite you to participate in the Twelfth International World Wide Web Conference on May 20-24, 2003, in Budapest, Hungary.

International researchers, technologists, and leaders from academia, industry, and government will gather at WWW2003 to define, refine, present, demonstrate, and discuss the latest ideas and developments.

The technical programme will include refereed paper presentations, alternate track presentations (see below), plenary sessions, panels, and poster sessions. Tutorials and workshops will precede the main program, and a Developers Day will follow, which will be devoted to in-depth technical sessions designed specifically for web developers.

Hungary is situated at the heart of Europe, and has the fastest growing economy in the region, especially with respect to information technology and telecommunication. Budapest is one of the most beautiful capitals of the world, and is easy to reach by air or on ground. The warm hospitality of the people, excellent food, reliable and frequent public transportation, vivid cultural life, and rich museums attract millions of visitors every year. Hungary has a visitor-friendly visa policy, economically priced services and goods, and a pleasant climate, making it one of the most popular meeting venues worldwide.

IMPORTANT DATES

Tutorial/workshop proposals deadline:

Submission closed

Paper submission deadline:

Submission closed

Panel proposals deadline:

Submission closed

Poster submission starts:

January 15, 2003

Poster submission deadline:

February 7, 2003 ***NEW***

Author notification (papers):

January 31, 2003

Developers Day deadline:

February 14, 2003

Final papers due:

February 28, 2003

Author notification (posters):

March 14, 2003 ***NEW***

Industrial track presentation offering
deadline:

March 15, 2003

Conference:

May 20-24, 2003

REFEREED PAPERS TRACK

WWW2003 seeks original papers describing research in all areas of the web. Papers should not have been published or be in submission at another conference or journal. Topics (descriptions can be found under the Areas) include but are not limited to:

Submission details

Accepted papers will appear in the conference proceedings published by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), will be contained on the Conference CD, and will also be accessible to the general public via http://www2003.org/ . Authors are not required to transfer copyright. Authors of accepted papers must sign and return a Permission and Release form. The official language of the conference is English.

Camera-ready papers must be submitted electronically by February 28 both in PDF and XHTML, and must be formatted using the ACM proceedings format with Letter size paper. The following style files must be used:

In case of PDF submission:

LaTeX:
www2003-submission.cls
www2003-sample.tex
www2003-sample.pdf

Microsoft Word:
www2003-submission.doc

In case of XHTML submission:
www2003-submission.htm

These are modified versions of the ACM proceedings style files. More information on the style files can be found at

http://www.acm.org/sigs/pubs/proceed/template.html

Notes for LaTeX users:

We encourage authors to submit concise papers with up to 8 pages; however, papers with up to 10 pages may be submitted, and an additional 2 pages (for a maximum of 12) may be purchased at a cost of $100/page. Over-length or incorrectly formatted submissions may be rejected without reviews. Final copies of accepted papers will be required in both PDF and XHTML formats.

Authors must also include a short 30-word statement with their submission which emphasizes the contribution of their paper. The statement will be seen by reviewers. For accepted papers, the final statement will appear in the Table of Contents of the conference proceedings and will be edited for clarity and accuracy by the program committee.

Submissions must be made at http://witanweb.www2003.org/

Inquiries can be sent to www2003-pc-chairs@necmail.com.

 

Copyright Information

ACM, as Publisher of the Refereed Paper Track Proceedings, will secure copyright ownership of the proceedings itself (i.e., the collection of the papers, but not the individual papers). ACM will supply its own ISBN (International Standard Book Number) and will register the Proceedings with the United States Library of Congress, for the purpose of formally recording ACM's copyright of the collection.

Authors of the refereed papers accepted for the WWW2003 proceedings retain ownership of their copyrights. As such, the authors are entitled to re-submit their papers to other publishers, post their papers on web sites of their choosing, negotiate re-use arrangements with other publishers, and enjoy all of the other rights normally belonging to holders of copyright.

Authors of accepted papers must sign and return a copy of the ACM/IW3C2 Permission and Release Form to:

Sheridan Printing Co., Inc.
Attn: Lisa Tolles-Efinger
1425 Third Avenue
Alpha, NJ 08865 USA
Fax: 1-908-454-2554 or 1-908-454-0179

Forms must be received by March 12, 2003.

ALTERNATE TRACKS

Alternate tracks include a combination of peer-reviewed papers and invited presentations. Topics (descriptions can be found under the Areas or in the separate Calls for Contributions) include:

 

Submission details for papers in Areas 12-16

(For deadlines and submission instructions of the Industrial Track and the Panels, see the separate Call for Contributions)

Accepted papers in Areas 12-16 will appear in a separate printed proceedings to the main refereed track proceedings. All accepted papers will be contained on the Conference CD, and will also be accessible to the general public via http://www2003.org/. Authors are not required to transfer copyright. Authors of accepted papers must sign and return a Permission and Release form. The official language of the conference is English.

Camera-ready papers must be submitted electronically by February 28 both in PDF and XHTML, and must be formatted using the ACM proceedings format with Letter size paper. The following style files must be used:

In case of PDF submission:

LaTeX:
www2003-submission.cls
www2003-sample.tex
www2003-sample.pdf

Microsoft Word:
www2003-submission.doc

In case of XHTML submission:
www2003-submission.htm

These are modified versions of the ACM proceedings style files. More information on the style files can be found at:

http://www.acm.org/sigs/pubs/proceed/template.html

Notes for LaTeX users:

Papers should be 6-10 pages long (regular papers), or 3-5 pages long short papers). An additional 2 pages (for a maximum of 12) may be purchased at a cost of $100/page. We encourage authors to submit concise papers.

Authors must also include a short 30-word statement with their submission which emphasizes the contribution of their paper. The statement will be seen by reviewers. For accepted papers, the final statement will appear in the Table of Contents of the conference proceedings and will be edited for clarity and accuracy by the program committee.

Submissions must be made at http://witanweb.www2003.org/

Inquiries can be sent to www2003-pc-chairs@necmail.com.

Copyright Information

MTA SZTAKI, as Publisher of the Alternate Track Papers Proceedings, will secure copyright ownership of the proceedings itself (i.e., the collection of the papers, but not the individual papers).MTA SZTAKI will supply its own ISBN (International Standard Book Number).

Authors of the Alternate Track Papers accepted for the WWW2003 proceedings retain ownership of their copyrights. As such, the authors are entitled to re-submit their papers to other publishers, post their papers on web sites of their choosing, negotiate re-use arrangements with other publishers, and enjoy all of the other rights normally belonging to holders of copyright.

WWW2003 retains the rights to put the electronic files of the accepted papers and the proceedings into its Digital Library (DL), and to make those files available to all authorized users of the DL.

Authors of accepted papers must sign and return a copy of the WWW2003 Alternate Track Papers Permission and Release Form to:

Viktor Richter
MTA SZTAKI
Kende u. 13-17.
H-1111 Budapest
Hungary
FAX:+ 36-1-386-9378

Forms must be received by March 12, 2003.

Programme Committee Co-Chairs

Yih-Farn Robin Chen, AT&T Labs - Research
László Kovács, MTA SZTAKI
Steve Lawrence, NEC Research Institute

POSTERS

IMPORTANT DATES

Poster Submission Starts:

January 15, 2003

Poster Submission Deadline:

11:59PM, Hawaiian time, GMT-10, February 7, 2003 ***NEW***

Notification to Authors:

March 14, 2003

WWW2003 POSTER TRACK OBJECTIVES

The WWW2003 Poster Track will provide an ideal opportunity for researchers and practitioners to present and demonstrate their new and innovative work-in-progress and to obtain feedback from their peers in an informal setting. It gives conference attendees a way to learn about novel on-going research projects that might not yet be complete, but whose preliminary results are already interesting.

THE FOLLOWING IS A NON-EXHAUSTIVE LIST OF TOPICS OF INTEREST:

  • Hypertext and hypermedia
  • Web accessibility
  • Intelligent agents
  • Resource management
  • HTTP and beyond
  • Performance and Reliability
  • Interoperability
  • Propagation, caching, replication
  • Real-time multimedia support
  • Reliability and error recovery
  • Electronic commerce
  • Agent Technologies
  • Web navigation strategies
  • Multimedia and streaming
  • Computer graphics
  • Browsers and tools
  • XML
  • Languages and standards
  • Scalability of web servers
  • Intelligent search engines
  • User interface and interactions
  • Distributed objects
  • Metadata on the Web
  • Architecture issues
  • Naming and resolution
  • Privacy and preferences
  • Security
  • Metrics and measurement
  • Wireless and mobility
  • Information mining
  • Collaborative systems
  • Virtual reality
  • Practice and experience
  • Web characterization

SUBMISSION DETAILS

Poster submissions must be made at http://poster.www2003.org starting on January 15, 2003. The deadline of Poster Submission is February 7, 2003.

The submission details for posters are the same as for the main refereed papers track, except that the page limit is 2 pages (no extra pages can be purchased), no revisions can be made to accepted posters, and an XHTML version of accepted posters is not required.

Posters will be peer-reviewed by members of the Poster Committee based on originality, significance, quality, and clarity.

Poster authors are not required to transfer copyright. Authors of accepted posters must sign and return a Permission and Release form.

Accepted poster papers will appear on the Conference CD and will be accessible to the general public via http://www2003.org. In addition to the 2-page submission, accepted poster authors will be asked to generate a full-size poster and possible demonstration to be displayed in a dedicated poster area and presented during a poster reception at the conference.

To encourage poster submissions of good quality, a Best Poster Award and a Best Student Poster Award will be presented at the conference.

For more information, please send e-mail to the Poster Track Chair, Irwin King, at king@cse.cuhk.edu.hk.

TUTORIALS AND WORKSHOPS

Submission closed

A programme of tutorials will cover topics of current interest to web design, development, services, operation, use, and evaluation. These half and full-day sessions will be led by internationally recognized experts and experienced instructors using prepared content.

Workshops provide an opportunity for researchers, designers, leaders, and practitioners to explore current web R&D issues through a more focused and in-depth manner than is possible in a traditional conference session. Participants typically present position statements and hold in-depth discussions with their peers within the workshop setting.

For more information on Tutorials and Workshops see http://www2003.org/tut&ws.htm.

DEVELOPERS DAY

Developers Day (D-Day) will be devoted to the interests of web developers, and will offer in-depth discussions of technologies and tools at the forefront of the web. This day-long programme will consist of several parallel streams focused on specific content areas. D-Day sessions are designed to be timely and state-of-the-art.

For more information on Developers Day see http://www2003.org/dd/.

REFEREED TRACK AREA CHAIRS

Applications

Vice Chair: Fred Douglis, IBM Research, USA
Deputy Vice Chair: Maarten van Steen, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Browsers and UI

Vice Chair: Marc Najork, Microsoft Research, USA
Deputy Vice Chair: Juliana Freire, OGI/OHSU, USA

E-commerce

Vice Chair: Michael Wellman, University of Michigan, USA
Deputy Vice Chair: John Riedl, University of Minnesota, USA

Hypermedia

Vice Chair: m.c. schraefel, Department of Computer Science, University of Toronto, Canada
Deputy Vice Chair: Peter Nürnberg, Aalborg University Esbjerg, Denmark

Mobility and Wireless Access

Vice Chair: Minoru Etoh, NTT DoCoMo, Japan
Deputy Vice Chair: Sarolta Dibuz, Ericsson, Hungary

Multimedia

Vice Chair: James Wang, Penn State University, USA
Deputy Vice Chair: Eric Chang, Microsoft Research, China

Performance and Reliability

Vice Chair: Craig E. Wills, WPI, USA
Deputy Vice Chair: Mike Dahlin, UT Austin, USA

Search and Data Mining

Vice Chair: Soumen Chakrabarti, Indian Institute of Technology, India
Deputy Vice Chair: Prabhakar Raghavan, Verity, USA

Security and Privacy

Vice Chair: Avi Rubin, Johns Hopkins University, USA
Deputy Vice Chair: Brian LaMacchia, Microsoft, USA

Semantic Web

Vice Chair: Ian Horrocks, University of Manchester, UK
Deputy Vice Chair: Brian McBride, HP, Bristol, UK

Web Engineering

Vice Chair: Martin Gaedke, University of Karlsruhe, Germany,
Deputy Vice Chair: Daniel Schwabe, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

ALTERNATE TRACK CHAIRS

Education

Co-Chair: Paul De Bra, Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands
Co-Chair: Wolfgang Nejdl, University of Hannover, Germany

Global Communities

Co-Chair: David De Roure, University of Southampton, UK
Co-Chair: Liddy Nevile, La Trobe University, Australia

Industrial

Chair: Mario Jeckle, DaimlerChrysler, Germany
Deputy Chair: Mary Ellen Zurko, IBM, USA

Practice & Experience

Chair: Arun Iyengar, IBM Research, USA
Deputy Chair: Krishna Kant, Intel, USA

Web Services

Chair: Steve Vinoski, IONA Technologies, USA
Deputy Chair: Francisco (Paco) Curbera, IBM Research, USA

W3C

Chair: Marie-Claire Forgue, W3C, France

Panels

Chair: Carole Goble, University of Manchester, UK
Deputy Chair: Bernard Horan, Sun Microsystems Ltd, UK

TUTORIALS AND WORKSHOPS CO-CHAIRS

Michael Bieber, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Beatrix Tóth, MTA SZTAKI

POSTER CO-CHAIRS

Chair: Irwin King, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Deputy Chair: Tamás Máray, Technical University of Budapest, Hungary

DEVELOPERS DAY CO-CHAIRS

Iván Herman, W3C
János Szél, MÁV Informatics

CONFERENCE CO-CHAIRS

Gusztáv Hencsey, MTA SZTAKI
Bebo White, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

IW3C2 Liason to WWW2003

Iván Herman, W3C

IW3C2 LIAISON TO THE PROGRAMME COMMITTEE

Arun Iyengar, IBM Research, USA

CONFERENCE ORGANIZERS

International World Wide Web Conference Committee (IW3C2)
Computer and Automation Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA SZTAKI)

WWW2003 CONFERENCE PARTNERS

Ifip Logo

International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP)
Working Group 6.4 on Internet Applications Engineering

Gradient background image
W3C Logo

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)


Programme Committee Members

Applications

The Web continues to be used in increasingly innovative ways. While other areas of the WWW2003 refereed papers track focus on specific application areas (such as mobile computing or multimedia) or core infrastructure (such as performance and reliability), the Applications area considers novel Web applications not specifically covered by other areas.

The Applications area particularly encourages contributions that are specific to an application domain, yet are of high impact and value to a large audience. We seek submissions describing broadly applicable concepts, methods, tools, and systems, and which make clear how others
can learn from a specific application.

The relevant topics include, but are not restricted to, the following:

  • Components and distributed objects on/for the Web
  • Distributed authoring and versioning
  • Distributed Web services
  • Embedded Web applications (a.k.a. embedded Internet)
  • Grid computing on the Web
  • Impact of the Web on industrial sectors or practices
  • Instant messaging and other synchronous collaboration applications and services
  • Ubiquitous computing and Internet appliances
  • Virtual reality on the Web
  • Web-based agent applications
  • Web-based collaboration
  • Web-based management/control/configuration of systems
  • Web-based peer-to-peer applications

Back to refereed papers track

Browsers and User Interfaces

The Web infrastructure and content were designed under the premise that users would navigate the Web using a browser on desktop computers. In recent years, however, new uses for the Web have arisen whose requirements are not met by the existing infrastructure. For example, most Web content is not well-suited for devices that have low processing power and memory, small screens, and limited input facilities, or that are connected through wireless data networks with low bandwidth and high latency. Making the Web accessible from a wide range of devices (including PCs, set-top boxes, PDAs, and cell phones) and applications presents many challenges.

The Browsers and User Interfaces area of WWW2003 focuses on promoting novel research directions and providing a forum where researchers, theoreticians, and practitioners can share their knowledge and opinions about problems and solutions related to accessing and interacting with data, services, and other humans over the Web. We invite original papers describing both theoretical and experimental research including (but not limited to) the following topics:

  • Automatic generation of Web-based user interfaces
  • Browser interoperability
  • Browsers on mobile devices
  • Multi-modal interfaces and applications
  • Novel browsing paradigms
  • Support for new Web standards
  • Tools and techniques for Web personalization
  • Usability and experience
  • Voice interfaces
  • Web-based collaboration
  • Web accessibility
  • Web page usability testing
  • Web visualization

Back to refereed papers track

Electronic Commerce

The automation of commerce over the web and other media is raising new research questions, ranging across the technical, social, and economic domains. The E-Commerce area of the WWW2003 refereed papers track is soliciting papers on all aspects of E-Commerce relating to computer science. We invite original research papers describing both theoretical and experimental research including (but not limited to) the following topics:

  • Automated negotiation and bargaining
  • Computational markets
  • Dynamic pricing and trading strategies
  • E-commerce performance issues
  • E-commerce standards
  • Formation of supply chains, coalitions, and virtual enterprises
  • Languages for describing goods, services, and contracts
  • Marketing and advertising technology
  • Markets for digital information goods
  • Payment and exchange protocols
  • Personalization services
  • Recommender, reputation, and trust systems
  • Social implications
  • Software requirements and architectures
  • Theory and practice of online auctions
  • User interfaces for e-commerce
  • Visualization of market activity

Back to refereed papers track

Hypermedia

Hypermedia is perhaps unique as a field on inquiry, since its contributors have been significantly from both the Humanities and Computer Science and Engineering.

Hypermedia and Hypertext predate the Web. Hypertext systems like Intermedia resulted in the first systems to deploy links. Hypertext research early on considered interaction issues such as Link Rhetorics - about what a link in a web page implies or should imply for where it takes the user. Hypertext also produced a body of work theorizing the implications for readers of non-determined texts, texts where a reader may choose one path/version through a story rather than another. Simultaneously, writers employed tools such as Storyspace to create and experiment with the freedoms that the link allowed in creating alternate paths through information or artistic spaces.

Concurrent with this work from the Humanities side, the Computer Science and Engineering communities proposed and developed systems, such as Microcosm and architectures such as Open Hypermedia and later HOSS and Hyperdisco that supported interoperability features such as multi-pointing links and linking across applications and across networks. In such systems Linkbases were designed to house links outside the documents. Similar ideas can be seen today in XLink and XPath. Hypermedia researchers from the AI community also developed adaptive systems and how to deliver better link choices to users based on their profiles or preferences.

Work in each of these communities still thrives, in conferences like Hypertext, Adaptive Hypermedia, and MetaInformatics, though much of this work is currently focussed through the prism of the Web, and in bringing to the Web some of the more powerful and interesting research of the Hypermedia community.

The Hypermedia Track of the World Wide Web Conference is an opportunity to showcase that work to the rest of the Web community. The Hypermedia Track Program Committee of WWW2003, therefore, encourage the submission of papers which seek to go beyond the standard desktop or palmtop web browser to present work on research questions which use web protocols, but are not be bound to the browser; to present research rich in lessons learned from Hypermedia that can be applied to these new Web-informed spaces.

To this end, this year the Hypermedia Track Call requests papers which focus on Hypermedia Systems Research such as

  • back end systems design and architectures
  • structural computing
  • versioning
  • adaptive hypermedia
  • linking models
  • interaction design
  • formal evaluations/benchmarks of these systems.

We also wish to open the forum up to consider questions like theories or rhetorics of affordances and constraints for content/document design, whether creative, scholarly or technical in hyperMEDIA as media.

Back to refereed papers track

Mobility and Wireless Access

The World Wide Web is facing a phenomenal growth in mobile access devices, embedded Internet systems, ad-hoc interaction, and wireless networking technologies, which are the key enablers for the next generation Internet. In fact, Web access services for mobile devices continue to grow and are gaining in popularity. Further, Mobile Commerce is becoming increasingly important with high expectations that it will create context-specific services for mobile users.

Technological progress in mobile communication, wireless appliances, and the respective mobile services lead us to believe that the future embedded WWW will be a digital environment that is implicitly aware of the presence of users and is sensitive, adaptive, and responsive to user needs, habits, and emotions. The environment will be ubiquitously accessible, mostly via natural interaction.

The Mobility and Wireless Access area of WWW2003 solicits papers dealing with mobile computing and wireless access technologies that promote the evolution of a WWW that is based on seamless access, awareness, intelligence, and natural interaction. Seamless access refers to a situation in which we are surrounded by a multitude of wirelessly interconnected embedded systems, mostly invisible and hidden in the background of our workplace, home, or outdoor environment. Awareness refers to the ability of the system to recognize and locate objects as well as people and their intentions in a non-obtrusive and implicit way. Intelligence refers to the ability of the digital environment to adapt itself to the people that live in it, learn from their behavior, and possibly recognize intent and habit. Natural interaction finally refers to advanced modalities like natural speech and gesture recognition, as well as speech-synthesis, which will allow WWW interaction in a much more human-like communication style.

Technical papers describing original, previously unpublished, completed research, not currently under review by another conference or journal, are solicited on the following topics:

  • Mobile/wireless computing architectures
  • Integration of wired and wireless networks
  • Mobile service management and delivery
  • 3G and 4G technologies and network solutions
  • Mobility and QoS management
  • Self-configuration in ad-hoc networks
  • Personal area networks
  • Media access techniques and terminals
  • Ubiquitous access and context computing
  • Pervasive/ubiquitous/wearable computing scenarios
  • Positioning and tracking technologies
  • Location-dependent/personalized wireless applications
  • Security and privacy issues for mobile/wireless systems
  • Mobile Commerce technologies
  • Device-independent Web access technologies
  • Web browsing technologies for mobile devices

Back to refereed papers track

Multimedia

Multimedia (images, video, audio, graphics, speech/language, ...) is critical to the success of the Web. The Multimedia area of WWW2003 encourages contributions in all areas of multimedia.

Relevant topics include, but are not restricted to, the following:

  • Intelligent indexing and retrieval of multimedia Web content
  • Application of machine learning and data mining to multimedia analysis and processing
  • Applications of Web multimedia: biomedicine, education, entertainment,
  • Animation, art, cultural studies, etc.
  • Multimedia security
  • User interface, virtual environments, authoring, multi-modal interaction
  • Multimedia systems: protocols, content delivery, integration, synchronization, wireless, etc.

Back to refereed papers track

Performance and Reliability

Performance and reliability are ongoing issues as the Web continues to grow in its diversity of applications. This area seeks papers relating to Web performance, reliability, and scalability for both traditional Web content and newer applications. These include streaming media, Web services, and the transient Web of peer-to-peer applications. Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Availability, fault tolerance, and reliability
  • Scalability
  • Server and proxy performance
  • Quality of service and service level agreements
  • Traffic characterization and capacity planning
  • Load balancing and resource allocation
  • Protocol compliance and robustness
  • Content-aware routing
  • Caching and replication
  • Content distribution
  • Edge services
  • Overlay networks
  • Web services
  • Peer-to-peer services

Back to refereed papers track

Search and Data Mining

The Web has over two billion pages stored at millions of servers. HTML is the embedding medium of choice, with only narrow vertical segments evolving XML-based data exchange standards. The extreme heterogeneity in organization and structure makes it difficult to harness the power in this critical information resource. While search engines have made great strides in recent years, especially in terms of hyperlink analysis, we anticipate further exciting developments in Web search and mining, specifically, new technologies that will help break through the barriers of syntactic search and content heterogeneity. We expect innovations drawing on statistical pattern recognition, machine learning, and data mining to discover latent structure from not only the Web graph at large, but fine-grained features as well, including linguistic clues. The focus of the Search and Data Mining area of the WWW2003 refereed papers track includes, but is not limited to, the following topics:

  • Indexing, information retrieval, metasearch
  • Hyperlink graph analysis and its application to search and ranking
  • Machine learning and mining for unstructured, semistructured, and relational data
  • Classification, clustering, collaborative recommender systems
  • Novel models for text, hypertext and Web evolution
  • Statistical analysis of Web-level, site-level, page-level, markup-level, and language-level structure
  • Natural language analysis, especially robust statistical techniques
  • Integration and reconciliation of semantically similar structure and  schema across diverse sites
  • Information extraction and message understanding
  • Question answering

Back to refereed papers track

Security and Privacy

The Security and Privacy area is soliciting papers on all computer scientific aspects of security and privacy as they relate to the Web in general, or more specifically to Web standards. ("Security and Privacy" is a new area to the International WWW Conference this year; last year this topic area was combined with "E-Commerce"). We invite papers describing both theoretical and experimental research including (but not limited to) the following topics:

  • Active content security
  • Anonymity, pseudonymity & identity management
  • Data center security
  • Digital rights management
  • Digital signatures
  • Intrusion detection for e-commerce
  • Mobile code security
  • Public key infrastructure
  • Security in content distribution networks
  • Trust management
  • User interfaces for security and privacy
  • Web server and caching denial of service protection
  • Web services security
  • XML security and privacy

Back to refereed papers track

Semantic Web

The Semantic Web vision of the web is of a place where data can be shared and processed by automated tools as well as by people. The web's full potential can only be reached when computers are better able to process the information available in it, to automatically integrate data from different sources, to perform actions on behalf of the user, and to search for information based on its meaning rather than its syntactic form. This vision requires new and advanced methods, models, tools, and systems for services related to access, retrieval, integration, and filtering of Web-based content.

This area solicits quality contributions on the theoretical basis of the semantic web, semantic web systems design, and application experience covering a range of topics and technologies needed to realise this vision, including (but not limited to):

  • Information representation
  • Information integration
  • Ontologies
  • Performance and scalability
  • Programming systems
  • Provenance
  • Security
  • Semantic web applications
  • Software tools

This is a new area. As well as papers arising directly from semantic web research and experience, we also seek relevant papers from a wide range of disciplines and communities which have a bearing on the semantic web including (but not limited to):

  • Agents
  • AI
  • Annotation
  • Automated reasoning
  • Databases
  • Digital libraries
  • E-services
  • Information management
  • Information retrieval
  • Knowledge acquisition and representation
  • Metadata management
  • Software engineering

Back to refereed papers track

Web Engineering

The World Wide Web and its associated technologies have become a major implementation and delivery platform for a large variety of applications, ranging from simple institutional information websites to sophisticated supply-chain management systems, financial applications, e-government, distance learning, and entertainment, among others. Such applications, in addition to their intrinsic functionality, also exhibit the more complex behavior of distributed applications.

Recently, there have been some advances towards making the development - design and implementation - of Web applications a disciplined and systematic endeavor, but the vast majority of existing applications have been developed in an ad-hoc way, leading to problems of maintainability, quality and reliability. Web applications are software artifacts, and as such can benefit from established practices from several related disciplines such as Software Engineering, Hypermedia and HCI to create, manage, and reuse structures of the information space and enhance the end user experience. In addition, it has its own characteristics that must be addressed, such as a varied user population, very short development turnaround times, diverse runtime environments, accessibility through multiple devices, etc.

Web Engineering addresses these issues and focuses on systematic, disciplined and quantifiable approaches to the cost-effective development and evolution of high-quality, ubiquitously useable Web-based systems and applications.

The Web Engineering area of the Refereed Papers Track covers processes, methodologies, system design, lifecycle and management of large Web-based systems, and education and research issues. In addition, illustrative case studies and best practices, showing how Web Engineering techniques and principles have been successfully employed are also welcome.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Web application development processes and methodologies
  • Design models and methods
  • OO technology and component-based Web engineering
  • Web application frameworks and architectures
  • Feederated Web services and service-oriented Web application approaches
  • Peer-to-Peer approaches for Web application architectures
  • Reuse and integration
  • Use and integration of meta-data in Web applications
  • Web design patterns and pattern mining
  • Managing system evolution and maintenance
  • Web personalization
  • Adaptive Web applications
  • Web metrics
  • Quality measures and evaluation
  • Web usability
  • Web application testing
  • Web application deployment
  • Performance modeling, monitoring and evaluation
  • Development teams and Web project management
  • Legal obligations
  • Case studies

Papers discussing relationships and interactions among Web development and other disciplines are also invited.

Back to refereed papers track

Education

The World Wide Web has caused a revolution in the way we teach and learn. The technology enables us to provide interactive learning material in new ways, and to incorporate learning objects such as animations, videos, simulations, and educational games into the local learning experience.

To make these and other experiences possible, many educational projects do not just bring new learning material to the Web but also contribute quite a few Web-related methodologies or technology. The WWW2003 Education Track is aimed at researchers who wish to share experiences and research results that are (at least partially) domain independent and that can thus benefit other teachers and learners who wish to get more out of the Web.

Relevant topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Development process of learning objects
  • Identification, reuse and granularity issues of learning objects
  • Business models for the exchange of learning objects
  • Agents and learning objects
  • Metadata specifications and standards for learning objects
  • Integrating (Web-based) multimedia in educational applications
  • User modeling in open learning environments
  • (On-line) adaptation to learner's knowledge, goals, interest and learning style
  • Web log mining applied to student progress data
  • Intellectual property issues arising from the use of learning objects
  • Social, cultural and multilingual issues in Web-based learning
  • Case studies in the implementation and use of educational applications in a Web-based environment
  • Authoring of Web-based learning material
  • Distributed and P2P-based learning repositories
  • Empirical studies of web-based educational systems
  • IR and text classification methods in open learning environments
  • Collaboration and communities in web-based educational environments

Back to alternate tracks

Global Community

Today, after more than a century of electric technology, we have extended our central nervous system itself in a global embrace, abolishing both space and time as far as our planet is concerned.

At WWW2003, we invite you to participate in the Global Community Track, where we will explore how the World-Wide Web has made McLuhan's statement part of everyday experience for millions of people, and what it will take to make it true for everyone. We will also be exploring the effect of the Web on members of the Global Community -- both those who currently have access and those who don't. We plan to provide an interesting and informative experience for those who are concerned with the use of the Web to develop and support global development to improve the lives of all people, around the world.

The Track will attempt to engage those who have a contribution which is of interest and will benefit others, whether presenters or active members of the audience. Some presenters will have submitted papers to be refereed in the usual way; we will also be specifically inviting a few people to contribute in this Track, and we expect many to come and lend their support and meet others with similar interests.

The range of topics is broad, but always the central focus will be "helping people everywhere reach their full potential as members of a Global Community, using the web". Necessarily, this topic also focuses on developing the web in order to maximize its potential to contribute to this process. Of particular interest will be presentations that contribute to increasing participation in and the value of the online world for all people. Presentations that focus on sustaining particular cultures and their contribution to the Global Community will be welcomed. In addition, the Global Community Track Program Committee will invite distinguished members of the research and cultural community to make or respond to presentations, seminar syle.

Topics of particular interest include the needs of:

  • artists, musicians and craftspeople
  • indigenous cultural communities
  • disability communities
  • global/local societies
  • freedom and privacy in a Global Community
  • describing, sharing access to, and discovering resources and services, locally and globally
  • cultural communities and practices - arts, crafts, literature, dance, music, philosophy, and more
  • creative, expository and scholarly publishing
  • multi-culturalism and multi-linguality
  • government and legal frameworks and policies

Back to alternate tracks

Practice & Experience

This track is looking for submissions which describe practical experience with using the Web. The scope of this track is broad and encompasses all of the areas of the refereed paper track.

Back to alternate tracks

Web Services

Web Services are evolving beyond their SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI roots toward being able to solve significant real-world integration problems. Developers of Web Services systems are currently working on new generations of Web Services systems that incorporate security, transactions, orchestration and choreography, grid computing capabilities, business documents and processes, and simplified integration with existing middleware systems. Current economic issues continue to force consolidation and reduction in enterprise computing resources, which is resulting in users discovering that Web Services can in some cases provide for simplified and cost-effective integration of disparate computing systems. As developers and users push ahead with their Web Services systems, all of these areas and more are in various stages of standardization through forums such as W3C, OASIS, and the Global Grid Forum.

The WWW2003 Web Services track is aimed at researchers and industry technologists who are exploring next-generation Web Services systems. We invite developers and users of such Web Services systems to share their experiences and results -- the good, the bad, and even the ugly.

Relevant topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Security, transactions, and manageability
  • Mediation, service chaining, and routing
  • Web Services application case studies
  • Registries and semantics discovery
  • Marrying Grid and Web Services
  • Web architecture and REST
  • Document-oriented vs. RPC-oriented services
  • Object models and Web Services
  • Orchestration and choreography
  • Legacy system integration
  • Performance and scalability
  • Web Services and B2B
  • Fault tolerance and high availability
  • Engineering design issues in Web Services
  • Mapping and transformation techniques
  • Intermediaries and caching issues
  • Evolution of SOAP and WSDL
  • Web Services deployment and life cycle

Back to alternate tracks


Service provided by dsd.sztaki.hu

Conference
Sponsors


IHM
Gradient background image
Hungary Tourism
Gradient background image
IBM Research
Gradient background image
Alvarion
Gradient background image
AT&T Labs
Gradient background image
ERCIM
Gradient background image
W3C Logo
Gradient background image
NIIF
Gradient background image
Voa News
Gradient background image

 

Conference
Partners

Gradient image
Ifip Logo
W3C Logo

 

Gradient background image